New research by Phocuswright offers insight into US leisure travel trends 

Younger travellers may wait to book their travel closer to departure, but they also spend more time on research than other age groups, according to new research from Phocuswright.


Summary:

  • Younger travellers may wait to book their travel closer to departure, but they also spend more time on research than other age groups;
  • Research from Phocuswright shows younger travellers aged 18 to 34 booked last leisure trip within two weeks of travel compared with 15% of those aged 55 or over;
  • Other highlights from the research include 30% of respondents conduct research for their tip on a mobile device;
  • Findings show the most important factors for selecting a destination is ease of travel followed by food and dining and landmarks and sightseeing options.

The company fielded a consumer survey earlier this year targeting U.S. adults who took at least one leisure trip at least 75 miles from home in the past 12 months that included paid lodging and/or air travel.

Some of the highlights from the research include 30% of respondents conduct research for their tip on a mobile device, and one of the most important factors for selecting a destination is ease of travel to the location followed by food and dining and landmarks and sightseeing options.

A solid amount of those surveyed – six in 10 – opted to visit a destination they had been to before and “more travellers drove to their destinations, with an influx of lower-spend travellers shrinking the share of travellers venturing abroad”, said Phocuswright.

The research showed younger travellers aged 18 to 34 booked their last leisure trip within two weeks of travel compared with 15% of those aged 55 or over.  However, younger travellers also spend more time researching where to go, roughly by a week longer than older travellers.

Phocuswright has previously concluded that a strong economy propelled more than 70% of the US’ online population to take a leisure trip in 2017. It indicates the “jump in leisure travel suggests rising consumer confidence, particularly among Americans with household incomes less than USD50K and middle-income earners earning USD75-USD100K”.